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    Working separately together

    A quantitative study into the knowledge sharing behaviour of judges
    Erscheinungsjahr2016
    Auflage1st edition
    ISBN978-3-7272-7675-0
    SpracheEnglisch
    Seiten206
    ProdukttypBuch (Broschiert)
    Reihe SZJ, 10
    Warengruppe Recht

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    Judges are knowledge workers 'par excellence'. Judges regularly need to sharpen and update their knowledge in order to respond to the complexity of daily work tasks. To ensure that judges are able to perform at their utmost level, it is important that they can make optimal use of the available knowledge in the organization. Whereas only part of the available knowledge in the organization is formally captured (e.g. in commentaries), judges need each other – and other important knowledge holders in the court – to obtain access to non-codified and personally retained knowledge. Through collegial knowledge sharing, judges can discuss complex legal matters and reflect on practical difficulties in their work.
    The focus of this book is on the knowledge sharing behaviour of judges, which is studied empirically using survey data from 447 professional administrative law judges employed in Switzerland, Germany and the Netherlands. The author reveals some interesting patterns concerning the factors influencing this type of prosocial workplace behaviour. Practical recommendations are formulated to inform court organizations about a number of steps that can be taken to foster collegial knowledge sharing in courts.